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ABOUT EMMITSBURG

Settled 1733 - Founded 1785 - Incorporated 1825

The beginning of the recorded history of the northern Frederick County is closely tied to rivalry between England and France. When the first Europeans settled in the Emmitsburg area, in the early eighteenth century, the English government was casting a worried eye at French moves to claim the interior of the American continent. France's holdings there threatened to limit English influence to the coastal strip east of the Allegheny mountains, and, thereby, prevent English dominance of northern America. Situated just north of the Monocacy Road, the major transit route for Dutch and German immigrants heading from Lancaster to settlements in the Shenandoah, northern Frederick County was ripe for settlement.

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NEWS-JOURNAL

Emmitsburg

Old Emmitsburg Road - Now Rt. 15. ~ 1890 (Taken from the Mason Dixon line looking south toward Emmitsburg)

Following the Civil War, the Emmitsburg area continued to grow as the home of many manufactures and mills. However, the decision in 1880 by the Western Maryland Railroad not to build its line through Emmitsburg marked the beginning of the end of independent prosperity. Life in 20th century Emmitsburg area was quaint by all standards, but it proved an excellent town in which to bring up a family. Nevertheless, it was beset with failing farms and the closures of several local industries. Unable to find jobs, many of the town's young people moved to greener pastures.

 

At the opening of the 19th century, it was impossible to walk down a country road without seeing slaves toiling in the fields. By the midpoint of the century, the abolition movement had gained increasing influence, and the manumission of slaves was becoming more common. Like many Border States, Maryland experienced divided loyalties during the Civil War, and the Emmitsburg area was no exception. It was not uncommon for sons of neighbors to meet on opposite sides in battle. During the battle of Gettysburg, the Emmitsburg area served as a front line staging area and was fortified as a fall back position in case the tide of battle in Gettysburg turned against the Union. After the battle, many of the Union troops bivouacked in Emmitsburg, and many of the wounded were treated here.

St. Joseph's College

J. T. Hays Foudary on West Main Street

The beginning of the recorded history of the northern Frederick County is closely tied to rivalry between England and France. When the first Europeans settled in the Emmitsburg area, in the early eighteenth century, the English government was casting a worried eye at French moves to claim the interior of the American continent. France's holdings there threatened to limit English influence to the coastal strip east of the Allegheny mountains, and, thereby, prevent English dominance of northern America. Situated just north of the Monocacy Road, the major transit route for Dutch and German immigrants heading from Lancaster to settlements in the Shenandoah, northern Frederick County was ripe for settlement.

NEWS-JOURNAL

Emmitsburg

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    Submit articles

    Past Editions

    Our Mission

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    About

    www.archives.net

The beginning of the recorded history of the northern Frederick County is closely tied to rivalry between England and France. When the first Europeans settled in the Emmitsburg area, in the early eighteenth century, the English government was casting a worried eye at French moves to claim the interior of the American continent. France's holdings there threatened to limit English influence to the coastal strip east of the Allegheny mountains, and, thereby, prevent English dominance of northern America. Situated just north of the Monocacy Road, the major transit route for Dutch and German immigrants heading from Lancaster to settlements in the Shenandoah, northern Frederick County was ripe for settlement.

ABOUT EMMITSBURG

Settled 1733 - Founded 1785 - Incorporated 1825

  •  

    Submit articles

    Our Mission

    Past Editions

    Advertising/Pay

    About

    Home

NEWS-JOURNAL

Emmitsburg

NEWS-JOURNAL

Emmitsburg

The beginning of the recorded history of the northern Frederick County is closely tied to rivalry between England and France. When the first Europeans settled in the Emmitsburg area, in the early eighteenth century, the English government was casting a worried eye at French moves to claim the interior of the American continent. France's holdings there threatened to limit English influence to the coastal strip east of the Allegheny mountains, and, thereby, prevent English dominance of northern America. Situated just north of the Monocacy Road, the major transit route for Dutch and German immigrants heading from Lancaster to settlements in the Shenandoah, northern Frederick County was ripe for settlement.

ABOUT EMMITSBURG

Settled 1733 - Founded 1785 - Incorporated 1825

At the opening of the 19th century, it was impossible to walk down a country road without seeing slaves toiling in the fields. By the midpoint of the century, the abolition movement had gained increasing influence, and the manumission of slaves was becoming more common. Like many Border States, Maryland experienced divided loyalties during the Civil War, and the Emmitsburg area was no exception. It was not uncommon for sons of neighbors to meet on opposite sides in battle. During the battle of Gettysburg, the Emmitsburg area served as a front line staging area and was fortified as a fall back position in case the tide of battle in Gettysburg turned against the Union. After the battle, many of the Union troops bivouacked in Emmitsburg, and many of the wounded were treated here.

Following the Civil War, the Emmitsburg area continued to grow as the home of many manufactures and mills. However, the decision in 1880 by the Western Maryland Railroad not to build its line through Emmitsburg marked the beginning of the end of independent prosperity. Life in 20th century Emmitsburg area was quaint by all standards, but it proved an excellent town in which to bring up a family. Nevertheless, it was beset with failing farms and the closures of several local industries. Unable to find jobs, many of the town's young people moved to greener pastures.